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.S. Attorney Thomas O’Brien: Lori Drew decided to humiliate a child. November 28, 2008

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ABC Jury Convicts Mom of Lesser Charges in Online Hoax, 27 November 2008

“Lori Drew decided to humiliate a child. The only way she could harm this pretty little girl was with a computer. She chose to use a computer to hurt a little girl, and for four weeks she enjoyed it.” U.S. Attorney Thomas O’Brien, chief federal prosecutor in Los Angeles, during closing arguments.

MySpace: Lori Drew off the hook on conspiracy, convicted for computer fraud November 27, 2008

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New York Times, 27 November 2008

A federal jury here issued what legal experts said was the country’s first cyberbullying verdict Wednesday, convicting a Missouri woman of three misdemeanor charges of computer fraud for her involvement in creating a phony account on MySpace to trick a teenager, who later committed suicide.

The jury deadlocked on a fourth count of conspiracy against the woman, Lori Drew, 49, and the judge, George H. Wu of Federal District Court, declared a mistrial on that charge. (more)

Verdict in MySpace Suicide Case November 27, 2008

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BBC, 27 November 2008

An American woman, accused of driving a teenage girl to suicide by bullying her on MySpace, has been cleared of one of the most serious charges against her.

Lori Drew, 49, was found not guilty of accessing a computer without authorisation to inflict emotional distress.

The jury failed to reach a verdict on another conspiracy charge.

She was convicted on three minor counts of violating the website’s terms and conditions.

Drew, from Missouri, was accused of posing as a boy on MySpace to befriend 13-year-old Megan Meier, who hanged herself after their virtual relationship ended.

The court in Los Angeles heard that Lori Drew was aware Megan suffered from depression and was emotionally fragile.

Drew was charged with violating MySpace’s terms of use, which ban users from assuming false identities and harassing other members.

The case is the first in the US relating to cyber-bullying.

Lori Drew could receive up to three years in prison when she is sentenced.

She would have faced a maximum 20 years if convicted of the more serious felony charges.

Megan Meier: Supporters gather on what would have been girl’s 16th birthday November 8, 2008

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Suburban Journals, 8 Nov 2008

About 50 people gathered Thursday evening to remember Megan Meier, who would have been 16 Thursday.

She most certainly, according to her mother, would have wasted no time in trying to obtain her driver’s license.

“She had talked about getting a car from probably the time she was 12 years old,” said Tina Meier, Megan’s mother. “So today is a hard day. But every day has been hard without her.”

The gathering was at a Dardenne Prairie baseball field on Hanley Road. A photo slide show of Megan’s life played across a sheet fixed to the back of the backstop.

There she was: a toddler with her new baby sister, Allison; a little girl before the Christmas tree; a basketball player at the Boys & Girls Club of St. Charles; and an eighth-grade volleyball player at Immaculate Conception Elementary School.

At times, her image on the sheet seemed to come alive, rolling with the wind.

Megan was 13 when she took her life in October 2006, the victim of a MySpace hoax involving an adult neighbor, Lori Drew, a family friend who had lived four doors away in Dardenne Prairie.

Drew, 49, is scheduled to go to trial for her role in the incident in Los Angeles Nov. 18.

“There are people who are not like Megan – who would not take their own life,” said Tina, 38. “Some people can walk away from it. But there are many who can’t.”

Cassie Thomas, 16, of St. Peters, recalled her friendship with Megan. She last saw Megan two months before her death. They saw a movie together.

“She just meant so much to me,” Cassie said. “She was a lot like me.”

“I was a good friend of hers,” said Brittany Osborn, 16, of O’Fallon. “I’m here to remember her and honor her. She was loving and easy to get along with.”

Those in attendance lit candles. Butch Moore, a family friend, sang “Who You’d Be Today,” written by Kenny Chesney. Some signed what Tina has called “The Megan Pledge,” which states, in part:

“I agree not to use technology as a weapon to hurt others.”

“I agree to think before I click.”

“I agree to think about the person on the other side.”

The goal is 1 million pledges. So far, Tina said, there are 425,000.

People said they came to remember Megan, or to support Tina, or the Meiers, or to support Vicki Dunn, of St. Peters, Tina’s aunt.

“We’re here in honor of Megan Meier and to help reduce cyberbullying – if we can in some small way – and to support the family,” said Jeff Brooks, 43, of Dardenne Prairie. His daughter is a friend of Allison Meier, 12.

Megan Meier Case: Lori Drew loses motion for a bench trial November 6, 2008

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St. Louis Today, 6 Nov 2008

Lori Drew, accused of cyber-bullying a teen who later committed suicide, tried but failed Wednesday to get a federal criminal case against her heard by a judge instead of a jury.

Her lawyer, H. Dean Steward, said she waived her right to a jury trial but that prosecutors, whose agreement is required, refused.

St. Louis area prosecutors had said they found no charge applicable to the circumstances. But the U.S. attorney in Los Angeles obtained an indictment in May that charged Drew, formerly of Dardenne Prairie, with unlawfully accessing MySpace computers in the process of harassing her daughter’s rival down the street.

Steward also is trying to keep any mention of the 2006 suicide of Megan Meier, 13, out of the trial, which is set for Nov. 18.

Lori Drew’s lawyers seek to toss cyber-bully case October 22, 2008

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TradingMarkets.com, 21 Oct 2008

Lawyers representing Lori Drew, the mother who is accused of using the social networking site MySpace to help cyber-bully a teen who then killed herself, filed a motion Monday seeking to throw out the indictment against her.

Prosecutors said Drew and others schemed in 2006 to humiliate Megan Meier, 13, a neighbor in Dardenne Prairie, using a fake teenage boy’s identity on MySpace.

Megan was first a friend, then a “rival” of Drew’s daughter, prosecutors have said.

Federal and state prosecutors in the St. Louis area said they found no charge to apply against Drew, but the U.S. attorney’s office in Los Angeles, where MySpace is based, obtained indictments accusing her of one count of conspiracy and three counts of illegally accessing protected computers.

Prosecutors say Drew violated MySpace’s terms of service, which prohibit lying when registering, soliciting information from someone under 18 and harassing other users.

In the motion filed Monday, her attorneys argue that the government must do more than simply allege that the terms of service were violated.

“The fatal flaw in the government’s case is that MySpace knew perfectly well at all time exactly what it was doing,” the motion says. “MySpace knew that it was providing an account to users who might or might not comply with the Terms of Service. Most users violate Terms of Service frequently, as MySpace is surely aware.”

Drew’s attorneys also argue that the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, which Drew is accused of violating, should not be used to punish “everything bad that happens on the Internet.” They also contend the indictment should be tossed because no theft was committed and the law Drew is being charged under requires a theft, as well as that recent legislation implies the law does not apply when the defendant and victim are in the same state.

It was not clear late Monday when a judge could rule on the motion.

MySpace suicide: Accused Lori Drew’s lawyer files documents challenging law July 23, 2008

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KTRS 550, 23 July 2008

Lori Drew’s attorney says the law being used to prosecute his client is flawed. H. Dean Steward represents Drew who is accused of using a fake identity on myspace to harass Megan Meier who later committed suicide. He filed 3 documents in Los Angeles federal court calling the law constitutionally vague and criminalizes something done by millions on-line daily. Steward also says prosecutors went too far to charge Drew with anything they could find.

More at St. Louis Post Dispatch

MySpace Suicide Case Megan Meier: Lori Drew indicted June 6, 2008

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St. Louis Post Dispatch, 6 June 2008

A federal grand jury in Los Angeles today returned an indictment against Lori Drew of O’Fallon, Mo., in the MySpace case that ended in the suicide of Megan Meier.

Drew, 49, was named in a four-count indictment that charges one count of conspiracy and three counts of accessing protected computers without authorization to obtain information to inflict emotional distress on Meier, who was referred to in the indictment only as M.T.M.

According to a news release from U.S. Attorney Thomas P. O’Brien, the indictment alleges that Drew and others registered as a member of MySpace under the name of Josh Evans, then began corresponding with Meier in what the girl believed was an online romance. After the “romance” ended, Meier hanged herself in her room.

By doing so, the indictment says, Drew and her co-conspirators violated MySpace’s “terms of service” that prohibit users from making use of fraudulent registration information, using accounts to obtain personal information about members who are juveniles and using MySpace services to harass, abuse or harm other members.

“This adult woman allegedly used the Internet to target a young teenage girl, with horrendous ramifications,” O’Brien said.

“Any adult who uses the Internet or a social gathering website to bully or harass another person, particularly a young teenage girl, needs to realize that their actions can have serious consequences.”

Ron Meier, Megan’s father, watched television newscasts announcing the indictment and was overcome with emotion

“It’s a a good day,” he said. “It’s an awesome feeling.”

He said now he expects the Drews to feel some of the pain and suffering “that I’m going to feel for the rest of my life, not having Megan here.”

Drew declined to comment, referring questions to her lawyer. She will be summoned to appear for arraignment in federal court in Los Angeles in June; she is expected to surrender to authorities in St. Louis. The conspiracy count carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison; each count of accessing protected computers also carries a maximum possible penalty of five years in prison.

St. Charles County Prosecutor Jack Banas said that despite the federal indictment, his position on possible charges in the Meier has not changed. He decided not to file charges after an investigation into Megan’s death, and he said today his position remains the same.

“I couldn’t charge it then, and I couldn’t charge it now,” Banas said. “It’s not a violation of state law.”

Read the indictment