jump to navigation

Palin Hacker Group’s All-Time Greatest Hits September 20, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, Cybercrime groups, cyberterrorism, Hacking, stalking.
Tags: , , , ,
1 comment so far

Wired, 19 Sept 2008

By Ryan Singel September 19, 2008 | 3:04:51 PMCategories: Hacks and Cracks

Anonymous isn’t so anonymous anymore.

At least not after one “member” of Anonymous, the loose confederation of online troublemakers, broke into the personal e-mail account of Republican vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin and then posted the new password to Anonymous’ online message board.

From there, others slipped screenshots and family photos to the leak-releasing website Wikileaks, launching a maelstrom of media coverage and widespread speculation as to the e-mail hacker’s real name.

For those unfamiliar, Anonymous is a group you can’t join, except by hanging out for a long time in the internet’s most juvenile corners — usually one of the image boards where everyone posts anonymously. 4chan’s /b/ board — or random — seems to be the main hangout, though other chans and IR channels seem to serve as adjunct clubhouses as well. The hangouts have almost no rules —  though using some variation of the terms fag, nigger and jew seems mandatory in every post.

The self-identified Palin-email burglar who uses the online handle Rubico said he got the idea while hanging out at 4chan — specifically its random or /b/ board (NSFW).

After watching others on the board temporarily lock up the e-mail account by trying primitive ways to break in, Rubico decided to call on the power of Google. With a combination of answers found through searches and an educated guess, Rubico was able to reset the account’s password.

Though Fox News famously and hilariously called Anonymous “hackers on steriods,” in large part they have little skill besides knowing how to use a web proxy to mask their IP addresses.

Instead, Anonymous keyboard miscreants combine online Fight Club-like bravado, inside jokes documented only on the world’s stupidest wiki, and harassment tactics that sound funny in theory but in practice are streaked with cruelty. The point? Fun at other people’s expense — otherwise known as Lulz.

The basic repertoire? Prank phone calls, ordering pizzas to someone’s house, flooding a message board with obscene ASCII art. Advanced techniques include finding a way into someone’s MySpace account in order to send messages to their friends saying they are gay.

What are Anonymous’ greatest or worst hits?

The Epilepsy Attack — In March, a group of internet griefers flooded an epilepsy message board with flashing images that caused migraine headaches and seizures in some users. While it’s not certain whether it was properly the work of Anonymous, the assault was rumored to have started on a thread at 7chan.org — another Anonymous hang out — and much was blamed on eBaumsworld, an online site often derided by Anonymous.

The FBI is reportedly investigating what may be the first computer attack that physically harmed people.

The Scientology War — In January, Anonymous decided to take on a real target — the Church of Scientology — which its members considered to be an overly litigious cult. Soon, anonymous pranksters were ordering pizzas to Scientology offices, using denial-of-service attacks to scuttle its web servers and posting previously unseen secret Scientology documents.

They also briefly pointed denial-of-service attack tools at the wrong IP address — which happened to be a Dutch school.

The publicity drew hordes who wanted to participate, and soon many longtime Anonymous users found themselves annoyed with the new converts who thought Anonymous was a crusading organization.

The Habbo Hotel Raid – Anonymous has staged many minor incursions into other people’s online playgrounds, but one of the most storied involved a virtual world known as Habbo — a frequent target for bored Anonymous lurkers interested in ruining other people’s fun.

In 2006, hundreds of Anonymous users showed up using identically dressed avatars: a black man with an Afro in a grey suit. They blocked off the pool to other users, claiming it was infected with AIDS. They also formed swastika-like formations and flooded the site with stupid internet sayings. When users were banned, they claimed it was racist.

The Mitchell Henderson Harassment — The suicide of Mitchell Henderson, a seventh grader, stirred Anonymous, who gleefully decided that Henderson shot himself because he had lost his iPod, a fact he’d noted on his MySpace page. Anonymous grabbed onto a badly written message on an online memorial page for him, and turned the phrase “an hero” into an internet meme.

For more than a year, Anonymous kept up the fun, calling Henderson’s parents, pretending to be his ghost.

The Hal Turner Campaign – In late 2006 and early 2007, Anonymous had much fun with Hal Turner, a small-time white supremacist who ran an online radio show. Anonymous flooded one of his shows with prank calls, which then escalated in mutual internet stupidity.

Anonymous eventually flooded his site with too much traffic for his web host to handle. Turner tried suing the image boards — unsuccessfully — and finally he closed down his show after a hacker managed to unearth correspondence suggesting Turner was an FBI informant.

Web proxy firm working with FBI to trace Palin e-mail hacker September 18, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, Cybercrime groups, cyberterrorism, Hacking, stalking.
Tags: , , ,
2 comments

IDG, 18 Sept, 2008

The Webmaster of a proxy service called Ctunnel.com, which may have been used by a hacker to illegally access the e-mail account of Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, is working with law enforcement authorities to track down the person behind the break-in.

Gabriel Ramuglia, the Athens, Ga.-based Webmaster of Ctunnel, said Thursday that URLs in screenshots of Palin’s e-mail — photos were posted online Wednesday on 4chan.org and other sites — suggested that whoever accessed her Yahoo! account had used his proxy service.

Ramuglia said in an interview that he was contacted by FBI officials last night and asked to retain computer logs of the last few days’ activity on his service and make sure nothing is deleted. Ramuglia, who normally stores only a week’s worth of log data, said he would not have deleted anything anyway because of the illegal nature of what had happened.

Ramuglia is now in the process of importing more than 80GB worth of log data into a database for analysis. He said he’s reasonably confident he can help authorities sift through the logs and trace access back to the originating IP address — especially because the self-professed hacker has admitted using just one proxy service to access Palin’s account.

Notorious board user

The alleged hacker said in an online posting that he gained access by simply resetting the password to Palin’s Yahoo! e-mail account using its password recovery service. That’s according to a description of events posted on a blog site run by conservative syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin.

The first-person account was originally posted on a Web site called 4chan.org by a poster identified only as “Rubico.” That post, along with a related thread, was later deleted from that site — but not before a reader of Malkin’s blog apparently snagged a copy of it and sent it along to Malkin. Rubico’s claims could not be verified and security analysts have been skeptical of the claims.

According to the Malkin blog reader, 4chan.org hosts multiple boards, each of which is dedicated to specific subjects. The individual who first broke into Palin’s e-mail account apparently belonged to a group called /b/, which the reader described as the “most notorious” of the boards on 4chan.org.. /b/tards, as its denizens are called, are interested only in their own amusement,” the reader claimed.

Reset the password

Rubico allegedly became interested in Palin’s e-mail after reading media reports of her using a Yahoo! e-mail account and decided to try and access it by resetting her password. “It took seriously 45 mins on wikipedia and google to find the info” needed, Rubico claimed. “Birthday? 15 seconds on wikipedia, zip code? well she had always been from wasilla, and it only has 2 zip codes (thanks online postal service!)”

Rubico said it was harder to find the answer to one of the other questions needed for a password recovery: Where had Palin met her husband? After some digging, Rubico determined that the couple first met at Wasilla High School.

He said he used the information to reset Palin’s password and go through her e-mail to see for anything incriminating that might “derail her campaign.”

It was only after finding nothing that the hacker realized how easily he could be caught, since he had used only one proxy to access the account. So he decided to make access to it available to others on the /b/ board by posting Palin’s recently reset password. Rubico claimed he “then promptly deleted everything, and unplugged my Internet and just sat there in a comatose state.”

However, one of the other members of the bulletin board who Rubico described as a “White knight f..,” saw the thread and used the new password to go back into Palin’s account and reset it. That person then sent an e-mail to a “friend of Palin’s” informing her of the new password and what had happened, Rubico claimed.

Alaska Governor Palin’s email account hacked via social engineering September 18, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, Cybercrime groups, cyberterrorism, Hacking, stalking.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

ZDNet, 19 September 2008

Details describing how someone hacked into the Yahoo Mail account of Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin (pictured) emerged on Thursday.

The hack appears to have been accomplished through little more than social engineering, the process of acquiring personal information through social manipulation. The hackers exploited known weaknesses in Yahoo Mail’s password-recovery feature.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reported that a 20-year-old University of Tennessee student has been contacted in connection to the federal investigation of the break-in.

Since Tuesday, anonymous posters using a forum on the 4chan.org website have been circulating password-protected zip files containing the contents of the now-deleted email account once belonging to Palin. Various posts to the /b/ board have also provided insight into how the hack was carried out.

Like most web account services, Yahoo Mail provides an option to reset or recover one’s user name and password. What is unclear is how the account recovery was rerouted from the alternative email address chosen by Palin to a secondary email address.

One poster said it took only 15 seconds on Wikipedia to answer Yahoo Mail’s prompt for Palin’s birthday.

As regards the prompt for a ZIP code, Wasilla, Alaska, has only two ZIP codes.

However, Palin’s personal security question — ‘Where did you meet your spouse?’ — did slow the process down. The poster claimed it took several tries before they eventually hit upon the correct answer: Wasilla High School.

Webmail accounts are not alone in using online security questions.

In May, Acxiom, a Little Rock, Arkansas-based data-warehouse company, announced it was introducing a biographical authentication service that asks users of online banking and e-commerce sites random questions based on their personal lives, such as “How many fireplaces are in your current residence?”. The answer can be obtained from any US real-estate website.

Palin’s e-mail account plundered September 18, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, cyberterrorism, Hacking.
Tags: ,
add a comment

BBC, 18 Sept 2008

Anonymous hackers have gained access to the personal e-mail account of US vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin.

Those behind the hack put screenshots of messages in Ms Palin’s Yahoo inbox on the whistle-blowing site Wikileaks.

In a statement the McCain campaign said: “This is a shocking invasion of the governor’s privacy and a violation of law.”

It said it had handed investigation of the matter over to US law enforcement authorities.

Deleted messages

The documents posted to Wikileaks were from Ms Palin’s gov.palin@yahoo.com e-mail account and included five screenshots, two digital photos of her family and an address book.

The McCain campaign urged those in possession of the documents to destroy them.

The attack was carried out by a loose coalition of hackers which calls itself “Anonymous”.

The attack comes as Ms Palin falls under scrutiny for the way that she used personal e-mail accounts to conduct state business as governor of Alaska. US law dictates that all messages connected to official business as state governor must be preserved.

By contrast, personal messages can be deleted.

Ms Palin is being investigated for abuse of power by attempting to sack a state trooper who had recently been divorced from Ms Palin’s sister.

Subsequent investigation has shown that the gov.palin@yahoo.com account has been shut down along with another, gov.sarah@yahoo.com, also owned by Ms Palin.

It is not clear yet what methods the hacking group used to access to the e-mail account. The screenshots posted by the hackers reveal that they carried out the attack via a so-called proxy service to hide their tracks and limit the chance that they would be traced.

Earlier in 2008 the Anonymous group launched several online assaults against the Church of Scientology.

What is Anonymous? September 5, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, Cybercrime groups, cyberterrorism, Hacking.
Tags: ,
2 comments

Anonymous traces back to 2004 as a group of computer gamers and aspiring hackers, harassing other computer users. Message and image boards [Internet forums that permit users to post images and messages together] such as “enturbulation.org,” “4chan,” “7chan,” “420chan,” “711chan” and other *chans continue to form the core online haunts for the group. The London Guardian described 4chan as “lunatic, juvenile …” Anonymous derives its inspiration from forbidden fascist literature, such as their reference to Mein Kampf and liberally uses symbols of hate to instill fear into people.


Anonymous traces back to 2004 as a group of computer gamers and aspiring hackers, harassing other computer users. Message and image boards [Internet forums that permit users to post images and messages together] such as “enturbulation.org,” “4chan,” “7chan,” “420chan,” “711chan” and other *chans continue to form the core online haunts for the group. The London Guardian described 4chan as “lunatic, juvenile …” Anonymous derives its inspiration from forbidden fascist literature, such as their reference to Mein Kampf and liberally uses symbols of hate to instill fear into people.

One of Anonymous’s resources is Encyclopedia Dramatic (ED), a sick parody of Wikipedia written in an abusive style. Its “humor” is thin veneer covering deeply-rooted hate speech. There is no justification for pages such as the pages “Ni***r Manual” that advocates regular beatings of African Americans, or their page describing the Holocaust as “good times” with graphic images of the death and destruction perpetrated during the Holocaust.

Coordinating their actions through these forums and image boards, particularly 4chan and enturbulation.org, Anonymous has flooded computers of MySpace users with viruses and pornographic pictures and has raided online gaming sites. Their actions are anti-Semitic or racist or some other manifestation of bigotry; when people object, members respond with telephone threats uttered by computer-generated voices or with malicious computer attacks.

Anonymous is a convenient facade for criminal activity on the Internet and in the real world. Behind that facade are people, some of whom literally, not just figuratively, hide behind masks as they vent their basest impulses while rationalizing that their anonymity frees them from responsibility for their acts.

In July 2007, Fox News aired a special report exposing the actions of Anonymous. The report covered an attack on a MySpace user, whose account had been “hacked” into by Anonymous, and plastered with images of gay pornography. The MySpace user also claimed a virus written by Anonymous hackers was sent to him and to ninety friends on his MySpace contact list, crashing thirty-two of his friends’ computers. The report also included “raids” on other Internet communities.

In response, Fox News computers were assaulted with massive attacks from multiple computer systems designed to overload Fox’s computers (i.e a DDoS attack – Distributed Denial of Service attack) and Anonymous issued an even bolder statement of their purpose than it had previously ever articulated.

“We are the face of chaos and the harborings [sic] of judgment. We’ll laugh in the face of tragedy. We’ll mock those who are in pain. We ruin the lives of other people simply because we can. A man takes out his aggression on the cat. We laugh. Hundreds die in a plane crash. We laugh. The nation mourns over a school shooting, we laugh. We’re the embodiment of humanity with no remorse, no caring, no love, or no sense of morality.”

In keeping with this “mission statement,” the Anonymous hit list has included MySpace, Fox News, the Epilepsy Foundation website, prominent hip-hop websites and many others. Their attack against the Church of Scientology is for the same purpose.

On January 17, 2008, “Anonymous” declared its intention to destroy the Church of Scientology.

Immediately following that declaration, Scientology churches, leaders, staff members, and parishioners were deluged by bomb threats, death threats, vandalism, harassment, attempts at intimidation, and systematic interference with their telephones, fax machines, and websites. Individual Scientologists were harassed and prevented from attending services at their churches. Hate speech and hate crimes became a coordinated activity, and the perpetrators hid their identities behind masks like common criminals and terrorists.

Anonymous has fueled religious hatred and intolerance by denigrating the Scientology religion and its founder.

Hate crimes of Anonymous against the Church of Scientology per the Church of Scientology in Los Angeles:

– Death threats against Scientologists and its ecclesiastical leaders

– Threats to destroy churches of Scientology by detonating bombs in churches in the United States

– Mailing of envelopes containing fake anthrax to 25 churches

– 41 death threats

– 56 bomb and arson threats

– 103 threats of other violence

– 40 incidents of vandalism, including an attempt to set fire to one of our churches in Los Angeles

– 3.6 million harassing emails and 141 million malicious hits against Church websites, in an attempt to bring down those sites.

Anonymous attacks against the Church of Scientology have resulted in multiple local law enforcement investigations and two federal investigations into the individuals behind the crimes, putting the matter rightfully in the hands of law enforcement for prosecution of their hate crimes.

Posted with approval of the author.

Interesting background data on Dalin cyberterror conviction September 3, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberterrorism.
Tags: ,
add a comment

Source: Buffalo Grove

Teen gets probation for school threat

By Tony Gordon | Daily Herald Staff

Published: 8/16/2008 12:05 AM

A few minutes of Internet fantasy crashed hard into Jeremie Dalin’s life Friday.

The 18-year-old from Fox River Grove left the Lake County courthouse in Waukegan with a heavy heart and a long list of obligations to meet for his crime of making a threat against Stevenson High School.

Dalin was convicted in June of falsely making a terrorist threat for a posting he placed on an Internet message board that said, in part, “many will die at Adlai E. Stevenson High School on 10/31.”

And although the message was on the Internet for only five to 11 minutes on Oct. 29, it touched off a panic and other events that have left Dalin a felon.

Dennis Oh, 18, a Stevenson student, saw the message, made a copy of it and posted it at other sites, and e-mailed copies to some friends after being told by police not to discuss it.

Lincolnshire police detective Adam Hyde testified Friday that what Oh did sparked a fear so great in the community that the school received more than 500 phone calls the next day from parents concerned about the threat.

Oh, of 1245 Deerfield Parkway, pleaded guilty to misdemeanor obstruction of justice in March and was placed on court supervision.

By 4:30 p.m. on Oct. 30, anti-terrorism experts from the FBI were standing in Dalin’s driveway at 209 Bridle Path to begin sending him on the journey that ended with his conviction.

In his statement to the court, Dalin said he has sought consolation through the Internet since moving here from Switzerland three years ago.

He said he found solace there as he struggled to deal with isolation, the difficulty of learning a new language and troubles within his family.

“The only real person that wouldn’t judge me, talk back, be angry or mistreat me was the computer,” Dalin read from a letter to Associate Judge Christopher Stride. “To me, the Internet was a place where I could vent, cry and swear without anyone judging me.”

Both Lake County Assistant State’s Attorney Mary Stanton and defense attorney Michael Levinsohn asked Stride to spare Dalin any jail time, and the judge quickly agreed.

Stanton did request a sentence that would impress upon Dalin and others who may be tempted to act in a similar fashion that such an activity was not a joke.

“People have to understand what is going on in this country since Columbine and other scenes where armed people have descended on schools,” she said. “We live in a different world now.”

Stride said he recognized Dalin’s remorse and lack of prior criminal record, but also said Dalin needed to look into the face of what he had done.

“Imagine how those parents felt that day who did not know if their children were safe,” he told Dalin. “Parents whose hearts must have been in their throats thinking they had kissed their children goodbye that morning and now might never see them again.”

Stride sentenced Dalin to two years on probation and warned him he could face up to 15 years in prison if he violates any conditions.

He also ordered Dalin to write a letter of apology to Stevenson High School, which after it is approved by Dalin’s probation officer and the judge, will have to be personally delivered to school officials by Dalin.

Dalin also must complete 300 hours of community service, which Stride said he wants to be concentrated on Dalin sharing his experiences with other students.

Lastly, he ordered Dalin’s Internet use be strictly monitored and restricted to web sites approved for education and employment purposes.

Anonymous – a threat to society and peace September 2, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, Cybercrime groups, cyberterrorism, Hacking, myspace, stalking.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

Anonymous is a convenient facade for criminal activity on the Internet and in the real world. Behind that facade are people, some of whom literally, not just figuratively, hide behind masks as they vent their basest impulses while rationalizing that their anonymity frees them from responsibility for their acts.

Documentation for download (PDF)

Jeremie Dalin: Teen convicted after threat August 22, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cybercrime, cyberterrorism.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Lincolnshire Review, 21 August 2008

A teen convicted of falsely making a terrorist threat against Stevenson High School will serve 24 months of probation and must meet other conditions of his sentencing.

Jeremie Dalin, 17, of the 200 block of Bridle Path, Fox River Grove, was sentenced Aug. 15 in Lake County Circuit Court by Judge Christopher Stride. (more)

Similar articles:
Barrington-Courier Review: Teen on probation after posting threats online
Buffalo Grove Countryside: Teen put on probation for posting threatening messages online
Cary Grove Countryside   : Teen put on probation for posting threatening messages online

4chan terrorist hoaxer Jeremie Dalin will serve two years of felony probation August 19, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cybercrime, cyberterrorism.
Tags: , ,
1 comment so far

Lake County News Sun, 18 August 2008

A former Barrington High School student who was convicted of making false terrorist threats has been ordered to tour the county speaking to students about the importance of being cautious on the Internet.

Jeremie Dalin avoided jail time at his sentencing hearing Friday, but other provisions of his sentence will limit his Web use, and he’ll serve two years of felony probation. (read article)

Queens Federation of Churches Warns of on-line vandalism of religious sites August 5, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, cyberterrorism, Hacking, stalking.
Tags: , ,
1 comment so far

Worldwide Faith News, 4 August 2008

A group calling itself “Anonymous,” specializing in on-line vandalism, obscenity, and harassment, has
stepped up its attacks on ethnic and religious minorities and individual citizens — and church human rights groups, including the Queens
Federation of Churches, are sounding the alarm.

“These people are truly cyber-terrorists,” said Rev. N. J. L’Heureux, Jr., Executive Director of the Queens Federation of Churches, who serves
as the Moderator of the National Council of Churches Committee on Religious Liberty. “Their manifestos and their campaigns are aimed at
creating as much destruction as possible.”

Among those whose pain Anonymous laughs at, are those who suffer from epilepsy. Wired.com reported that hackers, likely Anonymous, had
descended on an epilepsy support message board and used code and flashing animation to trigger migraine headaches and seizures in some
users. Anonymous responded, “The epilepsy raid was mostly win, but there was one glaring failure, in that nobody died from our attacks.”

When a Finnish Anonymous poster named Pekka-Eric Auvinen said online that he was going to kill people at his high school, another Anonymous
member wrote, “DO IT, FAGGOT.” On November 7, 2007, Auvinen killed nine people including himself.

Most recently, June 27, 2008, as reported by MTV News, Anonymous hackers defaced two popular Hip-Hop music websites, substituting fake headlines
and obviously photoshopped pictures saturated with racial slurs and other offensive terms. The CEO of SOHH.com, one of the attacked sites,
issued a statement saying, “It appears that hackers are specifically targeting Black, Hispanic, Asian and Jewish youth who ascribe to hip-hop
culture.”

The New York Times Magazine (August 3, 2008) focused on “The Trolls Among Us,” examining Internet message boards which have spawned groups
such as “Anonymous.”

In 2007, Fox News documented some of the crimes of Anonymous: destroying websites, death threats and spreading lies about people’s lives.

Anonymous posted their response on YouTube with a creepy synthetic voice-over: “We are the face of chaos and the harbingers of judgment. We
laugh in the face of tragedy. We’ll mock those who are in pain. We rush the lives of other people simply because we can. Hundred die in a plane
crash. We laugh. The nation mourns over a school shooting, we laugh. We’re the embodiment of humanity with no remorse, no caring, no love, or
no sense of morality.”

Meeting in Los Angeles on May 6th, a group of more than 100 law enforcement and government officials, clergy and educators discussed the
rise of Internet hate crimes, with the activities like Anonymous featuring prominently.

“Anonymous has even called themselves ‘Legion,’ a reference to the demons cast out by Christ in Marc 5:9 and Luke 8:30,” says L’Heureux.
“People of all faiths, working with law enforcement as necessary, should see that this sort of cyber-crime is cast out of the Internet, and the
real world, both.”

The Trolls Among Us August 4, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, cybercrime, cyberterrorism, Hacking, stalking.
Tags:
3 comments

New York Times on the character of “Internet trolls” or better: those behind cyber-crimes:

One afternoon in the spring of 2006, for reasons unknown to those who knew him, Mitchell Henderson, a seventh grader from Rochester, Minn., took a .22-caliber rifle down from a shelf in his parents’ bedroom closet and shot himself in the head. The next morning, Mitchell’s school assembled in the gym to begin mourning. His classmates created a virtual memorial on MySpace and garlanded it with remembrances. One wrote that Mitchell was “an hero to take that shot, to leave us all behind. God do we wish we could take it back. . . . ” Someone e-mailed a clipping of Mitchell’s newspaper obituary to MyDeathSpace.com, a Web site that links to the MySpace pages of the dead. From MyDeathSpace, Mitchell’s page came to the attention of an Internet message board known as /b/ and the “trolls,” as they have come to be called, who dwell there. (go to the remainder of the 10 page article)

Melbourne/Los Angeles: Mall massacre hoax accused dies July 31, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cybercrime, death, scientology.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Nine Msn News, 31 July 2008

Jarrad Willis was found dead on July 8 in the Melbourne suburb of Frankston, police said. The circumstances around the death will be the subject of a coronial investigation.

Willis, 21, was due to face Frankston Magistrates Court on charges of criminal defamation, which were related to circulating an email rather than the threat posted to website 4chan.

The hoax threat, posted to 4chan’s infamous /b/ imageboard, claimed a shooting rampage would occur at the Grove shopping centre in Beverly Hills on December 6, 2007.

“This is my last message, tomorrow a shooting will go down at 189 The Grove Drive, Los Angeles … I will not stop until I am incapacitated or killed by a police officer,” the threat read.

Police reacted by scrambling officers to the shopping centre and launching an international manhunt, which eventually tracked the message to Willis’s IP address.

The police operation cost in excess of $100,000.

Willis, a 21-year-old philosophy student, was detained over the prank but never charged. Police later charged him with offences relating to other incidents.

The hoax attracted worldwide media attention and Willis gained notoriety among 4chan denizens.

4chan is an anarchic online community best known as a birthplace of many popular internet memes, including Rickrolling and LOLcats.

It is also intimately connected to Anonymous, the shadowy internet group that declared war on Scientology in January this year.

Willis’s death is an open coronial case and no date has yet been set for an inquest.

Update: New date set in the case of Jeremy Dalin July 22, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, christopher poole, cybercrime.
Tags:
add a comment

The case of the Fox River Grove teenager convicted last month of falsely making a terrorist threat against Stevenson High School, Jeremy Dalin, has been continued to 08/07/08 for sentencing.

Source: Court Clerk of the Lake County Circuit Court

4chan Cyberbullying: Web-initiated harassment of grandma continues July 20, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, cyberbullying, stalking.
Tags:
1 comment so far

The Herald-Zeitung, 20 July 2008

Web postings urging online and telephone harassment of Herald-Zeitung employees appeared Saturday morning on the Internet hours after an article was published describing similar attacks toward a New Braunfels woman.

Throughout the past week, published news stories and video news clips from San Antonio and Austin television stations posted on YouTube reported that New Braunfels grandmother Mary Alice Altorfer believed a printed flyer stuck on the gate to her River Tree neighborhood’s pool was a racist insult toward her two biracial grandchildren. Soon anonymous Internet postings critical of Altorfer urged Internet viewers to harass her. Altorfer said she received crank phone calls. She was the subject of abusive and derisive comments posted on Web sites.

The homemade flyer depicting a black man with a large Afro bears the words “Pool’s Closed,” and appeared after Altorfer’s visiting grandchildren, ages 6 and 8, went for a swim in the pool.

The image on the flyer is an avatar, and according to numerous Web postings, an icon that was used by members of an Internet users “collective” calling itself “Anonymous” during an attack in 2006 on the Habba game Web site. The attack reportedly was initiated because the Web site would not allow game players to use African-American avatars.

On Internet postings this past week, Altorfer’s assertion that the flyer was a racist gesture to her grandchildren was cited as the reason by “anonymous” Internet users for harassing Altorfer. (continue)

Dalin Case: Sentencing postponed July 18, 2008

Posted by cyberpatrol in 4chan.org, Anonymous, christopher poole, cybercrime.
Tags:
2 comments

Daily Herald, 18 July 2008

Sentencing postponed

The sentencing hearing for a Fox River Grove teenager convicted last month of falsely making a terrorist threat against Stevenson High School was postponed Thursday. Jeremie Dalin faces up to 15 years in prison for posting the threat on a Web site last fall. The sentencing had been scheduled for Thursday afternoon in Lake County circuit court but was called off. No information was available about a new date.